Do I Have To Make My Own Yogurt?

I received the following question from a follower of the blog.  Please find below my research results.

The question:

I was trying to Investigate if yogurt Fage total would be considered “legal”. Below is their response.

“We make FAGE Total All Natural Greek Strained yogurt using a proprietary process.

First, the milk is pasteurized to destroy any harmful bacteria. Next, the FAGE Total live active yogurt culture is added to the milk. This culture is produced at the FAGE plant and helps to create the characteristic FAGE Total flavor.

We use a slow fermentation procedure up to a predefined fermentation result.  The yogurt then undergoes a unique straining process which removes the watery-whey and gives FAGE Total its thick, creamy texture. Approximately 4 pounds of raw milk are needed to make one pound of FAGE Total yogurt. During that process some of the carbohydrates are removed.  The amount or carbohydrates contained in our products is referred in the Nutrition Facts Panel on the Packaging.

FAGE Total is 100% Natural, though not organic. No added sugars, sweeteners, thickeners or preservatives. No powder milk, cream or protein, no nonsense. Just raw milk, cream and live active cultures for a naturally blissful taste experience. In line with our All Natural approach to yogurt making, our milk and cream supply comes from farmers who have pledged not to treat their cows with rBGH*.”

RESEARCH:

Question I found: Do I HAVE to make my own yogurt, or is there a store brand that’s okay? (I like Fage and Voskos.)  The scd insists that you make your own because for lactose to break down it takes a minimum of 24 hours. Grocery store yogurt only processes over a six hour period, so in other words, mass-produced yogurt leaves more natural sugar in it than home-made has, and sugar, of course, is our enemy.

Lucy – from lucykitchen.com responded:  I truly doubt FAGE would ferment their yogurt for 24 hours, when it can be done in less than 5. Also, even if they said they did, now we really have no idea what else is involved with making it. What makes it thick is straining it. We can make Greek yogurt from scratch by dripping our 24 hour yogurt for 8 hours. I think some people think if they use Greek yogurt as starter they will get greek yogurt, when in reality what makes it thick is the straining. Elaine used to say that she wasn’t trying to make people’s lives difficult with having to make the homemade yogurt, she knew people would prefer to buy it readymade.  I personally do not use commercial yogurt as starter because I worry that it might have unlisted bifidus in it. When you read on the label, “contains lactic bacteria, including acidophilus,” all they are telling you about is the acidophilus, but there are other strains of lactic bacteria in the yogurt.  Lucy

Also:  I emailed FAGE yogurt and asked specifically how many hours they ferment their yogurt and they emailed me the same explanation that was quoted from them from above.  They did not answer my question exactly as to how long.
 
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4 thoughts on “Do I Have To Make My Own Yogurt?

    • Unfortunately, this is how homemade yogurt is. Most of us moms started out making smoothies everyday to get the kids to eat the yogurt. Mix with bananas and frozen/fresh strawberries. Lucy from lucyskitchen.com recommended making the yogurt with half and half. I’ve even made ice cream with it to get him to eat it. I am back to making my yogurt with whole milk. I mix legal vanilla and honey in with the yogurt also. After one year on the diet, Justin eats it by itself now. It takes some getting used to. You didn’t do anything wrong.

  1. Pingback: When Yogurt Is All Greek to You « MEDCRUNCH

  2. FWIW – both my naturopath and my gastroenterologist (who is a big believer in SCD) are okay with organic, full fat Greek yogurt for SCD. You need to make the decision for yourself, of course. I personally seem to be okay with Fage. But making it is easy and cheaper.

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